Animal Adaptations

This activity was created by Elissa Hozore of Beth Tfiloh Dahan Community School.

In this activity, you will imagine the Finch as an animal and write a program to show how its adaptations affect how the animal acts in different habitats.

Bossy Finch

This activity was created by Dianne O'Grady-Cunniff of Charles County Public Schools.

The Finch is small, but it can be very bossy. Write a program that lets the Finch command the user. Your program should make the Finch do these things:

Avoiding Obstacles

Program the Finch to avoid running into objects. When testing your program, remember that the Finch obstacle sensors can be a bit finicky - large, lightly-colored objects (like cardboard boxes) make the best obstacles. Also, remember that a Finch can only sense obstacles that are very close to it (2 to 4 inches away).

For this project, the Finch should do the following:

ThermoBot

This activity was created by Tom Simpson at Heathwood Hall Episcopal School.

This robot changes its appearance as the temperature changes:

Direction with the Finch

This activity was created by David DeWitt and Mihaela Sabin at the UNH STEM Discovery Lab.

In the Sensing with the Finch lesson, you learned to use the Finch’s sensors to move a sprite on the computer screen. In this activity, you will use the Finch’s accelerometer to control the direction of the sprite.

Here are the requirements for this activity:

Simon Says I

This activity was created by Tom Simpson at Heathwood Hall Episcopal School.

Write a program that asks the player to orient the Finch a certain way. For example, the program might say, "Simon says: point beak up." After giving a command, the Finch should wait until the player makes the right move. To reward success, the Finch should blink its beak for 3 secs and speak the phrase “good job.” Then the Finch should give another command.  Your game should cover all six possible orientations (you can skip “In Between”).