CricketBot

This activity was created by Tom Simpson at Heathwood Hall Episcopal School.

When the lights are low, the CricketBot uses its buzzer to chirp like a real cricket. The darker it is, the faster it chirps.  Full daylight makes it stop chirping.

For this project, the Finch should do the following:

ShyBot

This activity was created by Tom Simpson at Heathwood Hall Episcopal School.

The ShyBot doesn’t like anyone getting too close.  When it senses someone is nearby, it changes the color of its beak, flashes its light faster, and beeps with higher notes.

For this project, the Finch should do the following:

SquirrelBot

This activity was created by Tom Simpson at Heathwood Hall Episcopal School.

The SquirrelBot must stay alert for hungry birds of prey.  When he senses the dark shadow
of a hawk above him, he needs to take random evasive action to confuse the hungry bird. Program four different escape maneuvers to allow your SquirrelBot to survive another day.

The requirements for this project are as follows:

Avoiding Obstacles

Program the Finch to avoid running into objects. When testing your program, remember that the Finch obstacle sensors can be a bit finicky - large, lightly-colored objects (like cardboard boxes) make the best obstacles. Also, remember that a Finch can only sense obstacles that are very close to it (2 to 4 inches away).

For this project, the Finch should do the following:

ThermoBot

This activity was created by Tom Simpson at Heathwood Hall Episcopal School.

This robot changes its appearance as the temperature changes:

Direction with the Finch

This activity was created by David DeWitt and Mihaela Sabin at the UNH STEM Discovery Lab.

In the Sensing with the Finch lesson, you learned to use the Finch’s sensors to move a sprite on the computer screen. In this activity, you will use the Finch’s accelerometer to control the direction of the sprite.

Here are the requirements for this activity:

Simon Says I

This activity was created by Tom Simpson at Heathwood Hall Episcopal School.

Write a program that asks the player to orient the Finch a certain way. For example, the program might say, "Simon says: point beak up." After giving a command, the Finch should wait until the player makes the right move. To reward success, the Finch should blink its beak for 3 secs and speak the phrase “good job.” Then the Finch should give another command.  Your game should cover all six possible orientations (you can skip “In Between”).

Finch Pong I

In this project, you will use the Finch as a game controller! You will create a version of Pong. A ball will fall from the top of the screen, and you will try to catch it with a sprite that you control with the Finch.

To start, you will need two sprites, a ball and a paddle (or a basket, if you prefer). The sprites shown are from Scratch, but you can draw these sprites in Snap!.

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